Posts Tagged ‘free family history websites’

Free Genealogy Websites

Tuesday, March 3rd, 2009

How to effectively utilize the free genealogy web site

If you are looking for the missing puzzles of your life, it is best to understand your roots. This could be done by studying and researching on your genealogy. And the best way to start your quest to know your ancestry is by collecting reliable sources of information by which you can trace them. One of the cheapest and abundant sources is a free genealogy web site.

The internet had modified the face of ancestry tracking. Sometime ago, genealogy relegated a bushel of challenging tasks to library works and long distance travels. But now, there is already the powerful tool that could be accessed in an instant for free. Genealogy web sites are potent components of research, however, proper care must be considered in order to optimize its advantages. What you need in genealogy are reliable and accurate information. For beginners, a tutorial resource on genealogy will serve as a guide so that your research efforts will not be wasted. The different techniques and types of document sources are the basic things to know in order to start quickly with genealogy.

 

In using the free genealogy web site, it is important to remember and document the sources properly. The web site address, abbreviations and significant notes should be indicated as foot notes or at an index page. This will be advantageous when verifying or rechecking your data gathered. Documentation often takes the place of a failing memory of the researcher. For another thing, these documents can be the key to resolve the conflicting facts that you may encounter in the process of research.

Your living relatives can help you verify the facts that you have gathered from free genealogy web sites. Interviews with these people bring about good stories about your ancestry. These stories should be recorded together with the names of storytellers. Then you can check the data you have gathered if they fit in to each other.

Other resources that can be found in the internet are census records, death indexes and obituaries. Though not all newspaper publish their obituaries online and not all deaths were submitted to obituaries or death indexes, these sources can lead you to clues and relative information. Much of this information is free, it is just knowing where to look. Ask the Experts is a course running at the forthcoming genealogy conference in Nottingham. It is being organised and sponsored by the Society of Genealogists under their genealogy officer Else Churchill. The Society of Genealogists has the largest collection of family history documents, films and  microfiche in the United Kingdom. Based in London, the Society fo Genealogists will be having their 100th anniversarry in 2001.

After taking into accounts all the possible resources, it’s time to organize these data. You need to highlight the documents that value most. Nevertheless, none of the documents that you find insignificant should be disposed. They could still serve as reference in the future.

Assembling the facts is another laborious chore. But when you get to this stage, it just means that you are almost done with that set. You can share with other researchers the facts that you have gathered. Who knows, it takes a few of you to assemble the puzzles of your heritage. There is the saying that two heads are better than one, surely too, more heads are better than two. After all, you are not the sole person in your clan who would like to find out the bloodline of your ancestry.

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